NYC
2018
Event Type: 
Panel
Room: 
1.75
Timeslot: 
Session 7: Sunday, June 3rd: 2:00 - 3:50pm
Event Organizer: 
Description: 
We are PhD students working in the realm of immigration with diverse positionalities, disciplines, methodologies, levels of focus, and research contexts, as well as traditionally understood identities (race and ethnicity, languages spoken, gender expression, country of origin). Our Moderated Dialogue embodies an anti-hierarchical, Bakhtinian approach to scholarship as an ongoing, polyphonic, future-making collaboration, signifying a disruption to traditional academic authority. As emerging immigration scholars with a variety of experiences, commitments, and visions in our work, we propose a transdisciplinary challenge to paternalistic, U.S.-centric ways of doing immigration scholarship. We will present our diverse research, which takes place across three continents, and identify key topics to be discussed, including the dialectics of local and transnational positionality, racialization and racialized experiences across borders, the complex relationship between sending and receiving countries, ethics in nonprofit education, and the complexities of volunteerism and national identity. This strategic project is an extension of our already powerful dialogical work as colleagues, and we look forward to sharing this radical methodology of knowledge production to inspire new, dynamic ways of approaching scholarship as a shared, transformative experience that values all voices and visions.

Participants

Katherine studies the nonprofit education of and with adult immigrants in the United States. Her work proposes a feminist, decolonizing, dialogical approach to educational research and practice which brings to the fore the voices and visions of adult immigrant students as active contributors in an... Read more
Katherine studies the nonprofit education of and with adult immigrants in the United States. Her work proposes a feminist, decolonizing, dialogical approach to educational research and practice which brings to the fore the voices and visions of adult immigrant students as active contributors in an... Read more
Vadricka Etienne is a Sociology doctoral student at the City University of New York Graduate Center. Her research interests lies at the intersection of race/ethnicity, immigration, and family. More specifically, her work examines how second generation Haitian Americans culturally socialize their... Read more
Chris Maggio is a 2nd year Ph.D. student in the sociology department who performs quantitative research related to immigration to the United States over the past 25 years. Specifically, he is interested in state and local policy related to immigrants, comparative work on new and traditional... Read more
Anna Stetsenko is Professor in the Human Development and Urban Education PhD Programs at the Graduate Center. Her research is situated at the intersection of human development, education and social theory including topics of subjectivity, collective agency/action, and identity – all viewed through... Read more
Friederike studies immigration through a critical whiteness lens and currently employs narrative analysis on how volunteers in Germany construct refugees and their own positioning in telling stories of their volunteering work.